Policy

About:

Article 68 of the Labour Standards Law states “When a woman for whom work during menstrual periods would be specially difficult has requested leave, the employer shall not employ such woman on days of the menstrual period.”

Country

Japan

Region

Organisation Location

National

Date of Introduction

1947

Status of Policy

Passed

Specific Person/s

Ms. Meng (for herself, Mr. Grijalva, Ms. Norton, Ms. Wasserman Schultz, Ms. Moore, Mr. Conyers, Ms. Lee, Ms. Bonamici, Mrs. Carolyn B. Maloney of New York, Mr. GutiƩrrez, Ms. Lofgren, Ms. Jayapal, Ms. McCollum, Mr. Meeks, Ms. Kelly of Illinois, Mr. Cohen, Mr. Payne, Mr. Hastings, and Ms. Clarke of New York

Description

Article 68 of the Labor Standards Law states “When a woman for whom work during menstrual periods would be specially difficult has requested leave, the employer shall not employ such woman on days of the menstrual period.” While Japanese law requires that a woman going through especially difficult menstruation be allowed to take leave, it does not require companies to provide paid leave or extra pay for women who choose to work during menstruation. The concept of menstrual leave started in Japan in the early 20th century. In the 1920s, Japanese labor unions started to demand leave (seiri kyuka) for their female workers. In 1947, a law was brought into force by the Japanese Labor Standards that allowed menstruating women to take days off work. Then a unique legislation of its kind, it is now found in a few countries. Debate continues as to whether it is a medical necessity or a discriminatory measure.